Tagged: Art

Salvador Dali: Dante’s Purgatorio

Relating to CC102’s study of Dante’s Divine Comedy are illustrations made by Salvador Dali for Purgatorio. Here is a sample: For the full set of images, visit bit.ly/16MKCYi. To view Dali’s illustrations for Inferno, visit bit.ly/10jHp1E, and for Paradiso, visit bit.ly/17vAa9P.

WPA Literature-Related Poster #1

The Core would like to share an interesting source of literature-related art: The Federal Art Project, the visual arts arm of the WPA program from August 29, 1935 until June 30, 1943. The FAP commissioned unemployed artists, including Jackson Pollack, to create public service posters, murals and paintings. The paintings depict various programs and projects sponsored […]

The Future of the Bolshoi Ballet

The Core presents an article from The Atlantic discussing the Bolshoi ballet and its changing state. Here is an extract: History and lingering popular sentiments tether the institution to the state more than any other cultural venue, even if ideologically speaking, neither is much use to the other. Though Putin’s own insistence on machismo makes clear […]

Vlada Brofman- Core Writing Tutor & Musician

The Core is delighted to point out that one of our very own Writing Tutors is also a talented musician! Here is a video showing her singing solo: … and another showing her in performance with her band, NoMad Dreams: Vlada and NoMad Dreams will be performing this Sunday, February 24th, at noon in the […]

Leonardo & Michelangelo

The Core presents an article by Michael Kammen, summarized by Arts & Letters Daily as: “One was an upstart clad in pink and purple, the other an acknowledged genius. Florence wasn’t big enough for both Michelangelo and Leonardo…” Here is a sample from the article: Leonardo, widely recognized as a genius and brilliant draughtsman — his Mona Lisa was […]

Margaret Atwood’s “The Penelopiad” at BU

The Core would like to bring to students’ attention an excellent performance which they can attend- on Sunday February 24, the CFA Department of Theatre will present Margaret Atwood’s “The Penelopiad,” a play about the women in Homer’s Odyssey. The performance will take place at 2 PM, at the Boston Center for the Arts. It […]

The Saxophone and ‘The Odyssey’

Relating to the study of The Odyssey by CC101 every fall, here is an interesting fact: great saxophonist Chris Potter draws inspiration from the Greek epic for his music. In the article discussing the matter, Potter is quoted as saying: I read it [the Odyssey] in high school and thought it was cool but didn’t […]

Festina Lente: ‘Conserving Antiquity’ Exhibition

  From January 30 – July 7, 2013, the upcoming Festina Lente exhibition will offer an unconventional behind-the-scenes opportunity to survey the Greek and Roman holdings in the Davis Museum’s permanent collections. Featuring vases and vessels of all sorts and designs, relief portraits and standing figures, mosaics, coins and jewelry, human and animal forms, the scope of […]

‘Writers and Artists at Harvard’ by Helen Dendler

This month’s issue of Harvard Magazine features an essay by Porter University Professor Helen Vendler, about how important it is to understand, attract, and evaluate applicants whose creative talents might otherwise be overlooked. This is relevant to all universities, including Boston University, and it relates to the principles of the Core Curriculum. Here is an […]

Six Quotes: Kleiner on the Acropolis

“When you go into the Acropolis, why are all the great buildings off to the left? In the archaic day there was the greatest temple erected right before you. This was the temple the Persians burned down and which prompted Pericles and the Athenians to rebuild.” “Despite the agony on the centaur’s face, the whole […]