Studying Abroad

Spencer Morgan (CFA’23)

I have always wanted to study abroad; the ability to do so was one of the major deciding factors for me during my college search and selection process.  Interestingly, I am now part of an academic program that requires students to study abroad, such is the importance of expanding one’s world view to my college. I feel that my experience, so far, has done exactly that: my perspectives on place, identity, and culture have all be broadened while attending school, going to work, and traveling around one of the greatest cities in the world: London.

School

In the academic portion of my program, I decided to focus on history and art, which has meant taking classes on foreign policy, societal change, and of course contemporary and modern art.  I have not only been able to see some wonderful special exhibitions, unique monuments, and moving performances as a result of these classes, but in taking them have nearly completed a declared minor in History and possibly another in the History of Art and Architecture.

Work

In the internship portion of my program, I was paired with the City of Westminster Archives’ Conservation Department.  Over the course of the past few weeks, I have joined a small cohort of volunteers in mounting, framing, and packaging objects in preparation for a special exhibition, ‘Life in Victorian Westminster’.  It has been a wonderful introductory experience to the field, re-affirming my desire to go into the heritage sector.

Travel

In my free time, I made a point of going out in the city to explore the numerous museums, parks, and other points of interest.  I also traveled on most weekends to other towns, like Brighton, Kirkwall, and Dover, and major cities, like Edinburgh, York, Liverpool, and Bath.

I always knew that I was going to study abroad, but I could never have anticipated doing so during a pandemic.  I admit that there were challenges – travel restrictions, isolation requirements, and other necessary protocols – that made the experience different than what I had imagined going into college.  However, different doesn’t mean bad; I had an incredible time and was able to make some fantastic memories with some wonderful people.

I left London with a broadened world view and a new zest for life that I know will stay with me for many years to come.

Exploring Boston by Means of a Sweet Tooth

Brianna Spiegel (SAR'24)

Everyone says that college is transformative. From shaping identity, discovering values, creating life-long friendships, and preparing for careers, I can say that my experience in Kilachand and BU as a whole has definitely led me to accomplish those big things. But what about the small stuff? I have found that college changed me in unexpected ways, like becoming a foodie.

Now, I know this may sound silly at first. Maybe you’re thinking, don’t college students just survive on late night pizza? (And I’ll have to agree, there’s nothing quite like ordering Domino’s cheesy bread with your dining points). Or perhaps you’re thinking about budgeting - and it’s true, finding the spots to get the most for your money can be tricky. But living in Kilachand Hall, I had so many nearby options to choose from. Being on Bay State Road meant being walking distance to Fenway, Newbury, and more. And if something was a bit further away, my friends and I were just a block away from Kenmore station, where we could hop on the T and go anywhere in Boston!

Trying out new food places became a way to bond with my suitemates, neighbors, and friends in Kilachand’s living-learning community. From deciding on the restaurant, finding a way to get there, ordering and sharing the meal, and reflecting on all of the flavors and combinations, I found myself growing to love this process. Food transformed into a social and cultural experience for me; it was a way to explore the many diverse neighborhoods of Boston.

Because it can be a bit overwhelming knowing where to start, I wanted to recommend a couple fun experiences to try, especially for dessert - because isn’t that the best part of the meal? More than just the food, I hope that these ideas inspire you to plan your own Boston adventures and make memories along the way. I’ll also provide some suggested ways for how to get there from Kilachand Hall (91 Bay State Road).

L.A. Burdick Handmade Chocolates - 220 Clarendon St

I remember when my floor’s Resident Assistant (shout out to Christian!) took us all to this lovely shop, and we tried its amazing hot chocolate. L.A. Burdick is unique in that you can order to suit your chocolate preferences: dark, milk, or even white hot chocolate! Also, don’t skip out on trying a few of their chocolate candies and truffles, which have really rich, complex and creative flavors.

How to get there: Take a left out of Kilachand Hall, then take a right onto Raleigh St. Once you hit the Kenmore T station, hop on the train and ride two stops on the Green Line inbound to Copley (from where it will be a 3 min walk). If you’re up for about a 20-minute walk, take the beautiful stroll down tree-lined Commonwealth Ave in the direction of the Common, or opt to do some window browsing by walking down Newbury Street, Boston’s famous shopping area. Newbury and Commonwealth run parallel, so you’ll take a right onto Clarendon St either way.

Bova’s Bakery - 134 Salem St

My friend and I stumbled upon Bova’s in search of cannolis but wanting to avoid the infamously long line at Mike’s Pastry. We were amazed to see such a huge variety of pastries and cakes in addition to the classic cannoli that the North End is known for. I recommend getting a few with different fillings to share! Fun fact is that Bova’s is open 24/7, so perfect for those late night cravings. The North End, also known as Boston’s “Little Italy,” is definitely a must-visit site for anyone coming to the city.

How to get there: I recommend taking the T from Kenmore. Make sure to get on the Green D line inbound, and you’ll get off at Haymarket from which it will be about an 8 min walk. If you’re up for about an hour - but very scenic - trek, head down Commonwealth Ave in the direction of the Boston Common. You’ll actually walk through the park, and continue onto Beacon St, taking a left onto Somerset Ave. Continue straight all the way to Sudbury St. Once you get to the Rose Kennedy Greenway, a big intersection with trees and benches, you’ll cross and head onto Salem St in the heart of the North End.

What I’ll Miss When I Graduate

By Morgan Donohue (CAS'22)

1. Being a short walk from just about anyone and anything

One of my best pieces of advice is that Google Maps lies about how long it takes to walk somewhere. On campus, your furthest walk will probably be no more than 20 minutes. This made getting to class, stopping for lunch, meeting up with friends, and studying so convenient, because your destination was never too far away. If something is a little far, the weather isn’t fantastic, or you’re looking to go off campus, the T runs right through campus and you can hop on with your CharlieCard. If you want to go even further away, there are several ZipCar locations around campus that make quick daytrips very convenient. I will definitely miss the proximity of all of the places and people I’ve grown to know and love over the past four years.

2. The Kilachand advising office

Being in Kilachand means that the Honors College offices are right on the first floor. This is where you can stop by for meetings with your Kilachand advisor and other members of the administration. Your Kilachand advisor is there to help you navigate your way through Kilachand and the Hub, but they are also there to support you as a person. I will absolutely miss going to the advising office just to chat, and having a dedicated advisor who was there to help me along the way.

3. Bay State Road

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When I visited campus for my first open house, there was no parking close to Kilachand, so my family had to park and walk back, all the way down Bay State Road. And boy was it worth it. Bay State Road is, in my humble opinion, one of the most beautiful streets ever. It is gorgeous in the fall when the leaves change color. It is picture-perfect in the winter when it snows. It is beautiful in the spring when the trees start to blossom again. Even if you’ve had a busy day and you’re exhausted, it’s hard to walk down Bay State Road and not enjoy yourself. I am going to miss running down the street in the mornings and admiring the gorgeous buildings on my walks home from class.

4. The Dog Pound

I was never a huge sports watcher, and I am still not, but I will make an exception for BU Hockey. I absolutely loved everything about hockey nights, eating dinner a little early so you can get the good seats, learning the chants, hearing the BU Pep Band, and getting Raising Cane’s afterwards. With a Sports Pass, you can get tickets to any home game you want, and I highly recommend heading over to Agganis Arena for some hockey. I am going to miss putting on my hockey jersey and cheering in the stands, but I hope to come back and catch the 2022 Beanpot Champions at another game.

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5. My on-campus housing

I lived in Kilachand Hall my freshman and sophomore years, and I absolutely loved my room. I loved having a bathroom in my room, being across from the Marciano Dining Hall, and living close to the Kenmore T station. This year I am living in South Campus in on-campus apartment-style housing, and I love it! I get to cook my own meals, so I am learning new recipes all the time. I live in a brownstone, so I have those iconic bowed-out windows that get plenty of sunlight. Living on campus kept me close to my classes and my friends, and I was able to make dorms and on-campus apartments into comfortable homes during the school year. I am going to miss all of that, but especially my current apartment and its view of Beacon Street.

morganroom

6. Student discounts

Your BUID comes with a lot, and I mean a LOT, of perks. With your @bu.edu email address, you can get access to discounts for digital subscriptions like The New York Times and Spotify+Hulu, software packages like Microsoft Office and MatLab, and many online clothes retailers offer discounts after you verify your student identity. You can also get free or discounted admission to museums like the MFA and the Institute of Contemporary Art if you show your BUID or order online with promo codes. I am going to miss the savings, but mostly I will miss the easy opportunities to go and experience something new without a huge price tag.


Images © Morgan Donohue 2022 

Why Too Good To Go Will Be Your Best Friend

By Aiden Cliff (CAS/Questrom'23)

Hello everyone! Welcome to the Kilachand Blog. My name is Aiden Cliff and I am a Kilachand Ambassador, Peer Mentor, and KLAB representative for the class of 2023. I am a dual degree student studying economics (CAS), business analytics (QST), and finance from Billerica, MA. There has been a lot of academic focus on this blog lately so I wanted to change up the pace and focus on another fun aspect of college.

Taking time for yourself is such a crucial part of the student experience that often gets overlooked. What better way to do this than to grab a bite to eat with your friends? I wanted to share an up-and-coming app that I use all the time that made this easier than ever to do on a budget: Too Good To Go. This app is really unique since it repurposes all the leftover food that local restaurants have and sells it to you at a very low price. My friends and I have been able to get some really good meals from restaurants around the honors college this way and are able to reduce food waste at the same time. This is a great excuse to get out into the city of Boston as well and explore some new places to eat with your friends!

You can consistently get an entire meal for less than five dollars on this app from some local Boston favorites such as Otto, Ajeen, Shawarma King, or Twin Donuts. Not to mention the Insomnia Cookies on campus usually run a deal through here so you can get a dozen of their best-baked goods for only five dollars which is the perfect way to fuel a late-night study session. I highly recommend everyone download the Too Good To Go app to try a lot of really good local restaurants for cheap and reduce food waste at the same time! I used this a ton during my first year on campus and still continue to use it years later.

Feel free to reach out to me (acliff@bu.edu) if you have any questions at all about anything in this post or life at the honors college. I would be happy to talk about my experiences as an honors student balancing a dual degree, club sports, and academic research if you are interested in any of these areas. Also, feel free to check out my previous post about dual degrees linked here. Best of luck in your admissions process and I hope to see you on campus this fall!

 

The 5 Best Items to Buy at Trader Joe’s

By Emma Hartman (ENG'23)

One of the great joys of living on BU’s west campus is shopping at the Coolidge Corner Trader Joe’s. Every week or so, my roommates and I pack up our rolling cart and make the trek to TJ’s for affordable food that we can make in our Stuvi 1 apartment kitchen. After months of research, I’ve taken it upon myself to compile a list of the 5 best items to buy at the Coolidge Corner Trader Joe’s. I am not sponsored by TJ’s, but I probably should be. These are just my (and my roommates’) personal and correct opinions.

1. Veggie Bites

As a pre-med engineering major, I know all too well how hard it can be to find time to cook healthy food once things get busy or exam season hits. On busy days (or days when you’re just feeling lazy and want to watch Netflix), veggie bites are the perfect low maintenance, high nutrition option. Throw them in the oven for 10 minutes and walk away (just don’t forget to come back). They look and taste like tater tots, but are loaded with broccoli, carrots, celery, kale, onions, sweet potatoes, and a shocking amount of other healthy ingredients. You can dip them in pretty much any sauce (my roommates and I have tried all of them) and if you’re like me, they’re guaranteed to brighten your day.

2. (Vegan) Kale, Cashew, & Basil Pesto

For something consisting of such simple ingredients, it’s shocking how versatile this pesto is. I love eating it with the Trader Joe’s cauliflower gnocchi (which, honorable mention, are a blessing to gluten free eaters like myself everywhere) and I put this in all of my turkey wraps and sandwiches. Even if you eat it everyday, this tiny tub will last a while and you’re definitely getting your money’s worth.

3. Scandinavian swimmers

Cousins of the Swedish fish, the Scandinavian swimmers are as delicious as they are addicting. I find it’s best to eat them with my friends while we spend hours on our signals homework to avoid consuming an entire bag by myself per sitting. I hesitated to include them on this list because their appeal is almost too strong. I speak from personal experience. My suitemate Steph has a tragic Scandinavian swimmers addiction and buys several large bags per week. The fish have taken over her life. We’ve held multiple interventions, but to no avail. Please keep her in your thoughts and prayers. Anyways, these are pretty good. I’d recommend them. Everyone seems to like them.

4. Any Trader Joe’s Salsa and Chip Combo

They’re a classic and dependable (and cheap) combo. Nobody says no to Trader Joe’s chips and salsa. For some reason, they’re just better than other chips and salsa. Perfect for nachos and you can enjoy them by yourself or with guests. Enough said. 5. Dark chocolate peanut butter cups I’ve always been a sucker for any combination of peanut butter and chocolate, but in this case, pretty much everyone agrees that these are amazing. I like to eat them while I study for exams for a quick sugar rush. Pro tip: put them in the fridge for a few hours. You won’t regret it!

Free Things That Come with Being a BU Student

By Cathy Cheng (ENG & CAS '23)

Let’s face it: with tuition at Boston University costing almost $60,000 this year, you’d want to make the most out of it. So here’s a list of all the free things that come with being a BU student! Besides, who doesn’t love free stuff?

In Boston

1. The Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

Located in Copley Square, just a 20-minute T-ride away from campus, the Museum of Fine Arts allows free entry to all BU students! Just show your BU student ID at the ticket counter. The MFA is the 20th largest museum in the world with more than 450,000 works of art.

2. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Perhaps best known for the Gardner Museum Heist in 1990 in which $500 million worth of art was stolen, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is made to look like a Venetian palazzo (with some of its windows, balconies, and arches actually derived from palazzos!) with an impressive, lush courtyard. The museum itself houses art from around the world and is located approximately 20 minutes away from campus by the T. You can show your BU ID at the ticket counter, or use promo code BOSTUNIV when reserving tickets online.

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Boston (Photo by King of Hearts, CC BY-SA 4.0)
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (Photo by King of Hearts, CC BY-SA 4.0)

3. The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA)

Just a few minutes from downtown Boston and overlooking the Boston Harbor, the ICA exhibits contemporary art. Just 30 minutes from campus by the T, stop by for some arts and crafts (it’s mostly for kids, but who’s counting?), incredible views in the outdoor amphitheater, and contemporary art! Just show your BU ID at the ticket counter.

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (Photo by Smart Destinations, CC BY-SA 2.0)
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (Photo by Smart Destinations, CC BY-SA 2.0)

4. BSO Symphony Orchestra

Your BU student ID also gets you access to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Just register for a College Card to attend Encore BSO Recitals and other performances! You can pick up a College Card at the CFA Dean’s Office (855 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd floor), the GSU Information Desk (775 Commonwealth Avenue, 2nd floor), the CAS Student Programs and Leadership Office (685 Commonwealth Office, Suite 130), or the HR Office (25 Buick Street). You can register for a BSO card online with your BU ID!

On Campus

1. BU Shuttle

Okay, so this isn’t the most exciting item on the list…but it’s definitely convenient! The BU Shuttle has stops on the Charles River Campus as well as the Medical Campus, and is free to all BU students! Download the Terrier Transit app to track the shuttle!

2. Ice Skating at Walter Brown Arena

All BU students get free membership to the Fitness and Recreation Center (FitRec), and in turn, free admission to ice skating during open skate hours at the Walter Brown Arena! Just check their website for the hours. You do need to bring your own skates, or you can rent them for $5 at the rink!

3. Public Open Night at the Observatory

Nothing to do on a Wednesday night? Come visit the Observatory to look at the night sky! The Observatory hosts Public Open Nights beginning at 7:30pm in the fall and winter, and 8:30pm in the spring and summer. You can reserve your free tickets online at Eventbrite.

Online

1. Headspace

The free services that come with being a BU student don’t end there! There are also a couple of free online services. BU Student Health Services offers free Headspace subscriptions for mindfulness and meditation. Just sign up at this link with your BU login information!

2. Xfinity on Campus

For on-campus students, BU offers free subscriptions to Xfinity on Campus! Livestream some TV or find your favorite shows on Video on Demand! Just find Boston University under participating institutions and use your BU login information!

3. Microsoft Office

Need Microsoft Office for your classes? Well, it’s free for all BU students! Whether you need Excel for that lab report, or Word for an essay, you just need to follow the instructions on BU Information Services & Technology’s website to download Microsoft Office for your device!

4. Adobe Creative Cloud

Last but not least, for all the artists out there, BU also offers free access to Adobe Creative Cloud, which includes over 20 different applications. Follow the instructions on BU Information Services & Technology’s website to download this as well!

You may not get to all of these, but they’ll be there when you need them! Be sure to check them out and explore the city!

A Student’s Guide to Yoga in Boston

By Jamie Greene (CAS’23) 

As a college student, stress comes with the territory. Juggling classes, club commitments, and spending time with friends, all while keeping yourself fed and your room clean can be daunting at first. As the school year progresses beyond syllabus week and mounting interests begin to compete even more for your time, it is essential to develop strategies to handle stress and achieve a balance between work, school, and social life. So how do you manage? Among the top suggestions to alleviate stress is yoga. However, as a new student, you might not have time to independently research and test your place to practice yoga. Fortunately, after living in Boston for three years, I have compiled a list of the best places to leave your stress on the mat. 

1. Down Under Yoga tops this list, earning praise not only from me but also from Boston Magazine who granted the studio the title of Best Yoga of Boston in 2017. For the past year, I have been religiously attending Meredith’s 6pm class on Mondays and Wednesdays, and to put it simply: I’m obsessed. Situated near South Campus, Down Under is rooted in traditional practices and has cultivated a welcoming space for both lifelong yogis and first timers. With classes spread throughout the day and week, Down Under provides a varied schedule with plenty of unique offerings. Plus, they offer both a discounted newcomer and student special pricing as well as weekly free community classes.

2. Corepower. Boasting two locations near campus, Corepower is a fan favorite for all levels of yogi. Their class styles range from their beginner C1 to higher intensity classes such as C2 which incorporates heat or yoga sculpt which blends traditional practices with cardio and weights. The studio offers a free 2 week trial pass, giving students the chance to test out which class is theifavorite. Further with one location on Comm. Ave. and the other in Fenway, Corepower is a great option if you have extra time between classes in West Campus or for anytime near Kilachand.

3. BU actually offers yoga classes through FitRec, with a wide range of classes featuring different specialties of yoga. Not only can you attend a drop in class, you can even take some for academic credit by registering under a PDP. In addition to those offered at FitRec, Marsh Chapel hosts Mind, Body, Spirit, a meditation-based yoga class every Wednesday from 6:45-7:45pm.

4. Athleta Store Back Bay periodically offers free yoga at their Newbury Street location, with most classes. As most classes take place on Monday or Thursday, their in-house yoga can be the perfect way to set intentions for or unwind and recover from the rest of your week!

5. Boston Commons Frog Pond hosts free yoga classes throughout the summer (June-October)! The combo of free yoga and fresh air is truly unparalleled for those of us who want to practice while still sticking to a budget.

Although this list is in no way comprehensive, it includes a variety of options whether you have been practicing for years or just want to try something new. While navigating school, work, and a social life can be difficult, going to a yoga class shouldn’t be. Whether you venture out to Newbury or Fenway or only make it as far as Marsh Chapel, there is a yoga class that fits your interests and gives you the opportunity to alleviate your stress in about an hour.

 

The London Study Abroad Experience

By Richard Boylan (COM‘22)

Unsure about whether studying abroad is for you? Here’s some of the best reasons to consider a semester in London!

1. Academics

Admittedly, a great academic experience likely isn’t the first thing you consider when picturing a semester in London, but the classes are unlike anything you’ll take in Boston. With classes taught by British professors each places a uniquely UK-centric focus on your typical major classes. Think a film & tv class focused on the history of British genre films with multiple field trips including a visit to the West End to see a musical satire of the Royal Family. Even more exciting is the guarantee of an internship during the semester. During the second half of the program you’ll intern four days a week at a London-based company getting hands-on experience in your field of interest.

2. The Social Programme

Just as important as academics is the BU London Program’s emphasis on getting to explore the city. The Social Programme is the official name for the various events and day trips offered to students throughout the semester. Visits to Stonehenge, soccer games, plays, Warner Brothers Studio, and national landmarks like Kensington Palace are all offered to students at significantly reduced prices and offer the best value anywhere to see London. Since BU’s study abroad programs are open to a number of partner colleges and universities these events also give you the chance to meet students from all over the U.S.

3. The Museums

London not only boasts some of the best museums in the world, but many of them happen to be free too! The Natural History Museum, Science Museum, and Victoria & Albert Museum are all located within walking distance of all three of the BU London residences. Each offers a unique experience ranging from the ability to experience a magnitude 6.9 earthquake to exploring an exhibit on the rise of David Bowie.

Looking to spend the afternoon exploring famous artwork from as early as the 12th century? The National Gallery is the museum for you. With three wings, the National Gallery houses some of the most well-known works from artists such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Monet, and van Gogh. More interested in mummies and ancient Greek artifacts? The British Museum offers a centuries spanning collection from around the world including its crowning gem: the Rosetta Stone. 

4. Take A Weekend Trip to Europe

Arguably the best part about studying abroad in London is its proximity to Europe and the rest of the UK. Weekend trips to Wales, Scotland, and Ireland are only a short flight or cheap bus ride away. Similarly the Europe-spanning Eurostar trains depart from St. Pancras International Station daily. With cities like Paris and Brussels less than a three hour train ride away, the railways provide an affordable way to explore all the beauty, history, and culture Europe has to offer.

Richie Blog 2

Things to Do Around Boston

By Jackson Wallace (CAS'22)

One of the greatest advantages of going to school in a large city is that there are so many activities to do and places to go. Whether you are looking for something to do close to Boston University, something that’s a little further into the city, or something in the surrounding area of Boston, there is somewhere to go.

For places that are within close walking distance of BU, the closest would be Fenway Park, which is about five minutes from East Campus. Periodically, there are student tickets to the games available for $9, which are a great experience for a group of friends. The more popular games are usually harder to get tickets for, but if you are a big fan of baseball it can be quite thrilling to watch the Sox play in important games. Another place that is a small walk from East Campus is Trident. Located on Newbury Street in the Back Bay neighborhood, Trident is a bookstore that also doubles as a cafe. They also host fun events such as a trivia night. One final location that is not too far from BU is the Museum of Fine Arts. BU students have free access to the museum with their student IDs. There is a lot of art at the museum and most people will tell you that you’ll want to go multiple times to get a full experience, plus there are frequent temporary exhibitions.

A little further away (i.e. requiring serious dedication to walking or public transit) is the North End neighborhood of Boston. This area of Boston is famed for its Italian heritage with numerous Italian restaurants and pastry shops. To get there, you’ll likely want to take the Green Line down to the Haymarket stop. If that makes no sense to you, don’t worry; you’ll pick up the subway lingo in no time at BU. A location out further still is the Harbor Islands. These require a ferry to get to but are beautiful to hike around on.

A final location that, while not located in Boston, is possible to get to by public transit is Salem, Massachusetts. Getting to Salem requires taking the commuter rail. Once there, there is plenty to do in Salem, from walking around the historic town to shopping. However, be warned that it gets quite crowded (and spooky) in Salem the closer it gets to Halloween.

Breaking Out of the “BU Bubble” with Kilachand

By Rebecca Sarkisian (Questrom’23)

One of the first terms you’ll hear during your time at BU is something called the “BU Bubble.” The Bubble looks different for everyone, but essentially it involves being stuck in the same routines and going to the same places on campus all the time. While BU is integrated into the city of Boston, it can be really easy to just always stay on campus and forget that there is an entire city of new experiences just a few steps from Comm Ave.

Kilachand co-curriculars are one of the best parts of being in the Honors College. You often get to hear from top experts in a wide variety of fields. But my favorite co-curriculars are those that help you break out of the BU Bubble by going out into the city with other Kilachand students.

This Fall, the first co-curricular of the semester was a visit to the Arnold Arboretum, a large park in Jamaica Plain maintained by Harvard University. Kilachand faculty and staff led small groups of students on excursions to the Arboretum throughout the beginning of the semester to participate in the Arboretum Experience. The Arboretum Experience is a mix of meditations, audio plays, and other guides that help shape your visit to the Arboretum.

I went to the Arboretum on a Saturday morning with a Kilachand advisor and four other Kilachand students. Not only did I get to meet new people from other class years, but I was able to take a break from city life for a bit. The trip also gave me an opportunity to visit a place that I may not have otherwise visited.

Arnold Arboretum offers a quiet escape from the city
Arnold Arboretum offers a quiet escape from the city. Credit: Rebecca S.

It’s not just co-curriculars that take Kilachand students out of the BU Bubble. My first semester in Kilachand, I visited the Institute of Contemporary Art in the Seaport as part of my writing studio. One of the exhibits in the museum connected to the themes of the class, so we were encouraged to visit and write about the art. (Side note: the ICA is free for BU students!)

Kilachand student leaders also take small groups on city excursions during Kilachand Community Initiative outings. The outings are a great way to meet fellow Kilachand students, visit new places, take a break from studying, and just get to know Boston better.

No matter whether it’s a co-curricular, class trip, or Community Initiative outing, there are plenty of ways to break out of the BU Bubble with Kilachand.