Our Fave Five Things in Kilachand Hall

Caroline Perna (SAR’25) & Veronica McKinney (CAS’25)

#1: Chrissy

On the first floor of Kilachand Hall are the staff offices, which enable students to build relationships with staff and administration. When you first walk in, you’ll see Chrissy standing behind her desk with her welcoming smile. Chrissy is one of the newest additions to the Kilachand Staff, and she is always a light that brightens our days. Throughout our freshman year, we have had the joy to get to know Chrissy.  She is an awesome resource if you ever need to talk, get advice, or if you need a hug. Over the last few months, Chrissy has become a “mom” for us since we are physically far away from our families, and we have a lunch date with her every few weeks. Make sure to pop in and say hi, and tell her that Caroline and Veronica sent you!

Caroline & Chrissy selfie
Veronica & Chrissy twinning (accidentally)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#2: Kitchen

We are lucky to have a fully functioning kitchen on the first floor of Kilachand Hall (one of the only kitchens easily accessible to freshmen at BU)! The kitchen is an awesome way to bring people together to cook, bake, and hangout! Our favorite cooking experiments have been: chocolate chip banana bread, brunch eggs and crepes, and a surprise birthday cake for our friend Tanvi! Although you have to provide the food and cooking dishes, the kitchen is recently renovated, right downstairs, and easy to use. You should definitely take advantage and show off your cooking skills! (Warning: don’t use anything you find in the fridge…)

Tanvi’s partially eaten birthday cake
Banana bread in progress

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hangout sesh
The beautiful kitchen

#3: Coffee & Snacks

In the offices of Kilachand Hall there is a lovely coffee machine (with more than 60 different possible drinks) and a box of snacks. We make sure to stop in the office nearly every day to get our yummy drink, or chips, or chocolate, or granola bar, or cookie… the options are endless. This has been a really convenient (and free) option to get some fuel for the day!  (And we were especially grateful for the steaming hot chocolates on the coldest Boston winter days.) Chrissy stays vigilant on keeping the snack box replenished, and she looks the other way if you want to stock up on some snacks for later… 😉 If you ever have the chance, you should definitely use this (did we mention free?) pick-me-up station. (Bonus: you get to see Chrissy while you’re there!)

Our favorite little coffee machine
Coffee fixings and the snack box
Veronica & Nora
Chrissy & Rick with the popcorn machine

#4: 9th Floor Study Spaces

On the top floor of Kilachand Hall is a common area and quiet study room!  The main entrance area has a dance floor and stage because Kilachand Hall used to be a Sheridan hotel.  There are tables all over for you to work or hangout with friends, and a TV is available if you want to host a movie night!  If you need to actually get some work done, there is a VERY quiet study room (where you can literally hear a pin drop).  Kilachand Hall renovations are starting this summer 2022 (more information is up on the website), so the 9th floor will be upgraded with brand new classrooms, study spaces, and windows to overlook our stunning view of the Charles River.  (Around sunset, the whole floor is aglow in warm lighting that is perfect for selfies!)

9th floor friends enjoying a late night snack!
9th floor open space

#5: 1st Floor Lounge

Our recently renovated first floor lobby and common room is one of the most active places in the building! During the day, students will work in between classes, and in the evenings, the room is even busier!  While working, you may enjoy some nice ambient music from the public piano, or the aforementioned snacks and drinks from the front office.  If you need a quick study break, board games are available for anyone to use, and the blue couches are surprisingly comfortable if you need to take a power nap!  Our monthly Kilachand Teas are also hosted on the 1st floor, where you can get free drinks and food (our personal favorites are the chocolate covered strawberries and chips and hummus!).  Co-curriculars and events like the open KHC Closet (pictured below) are often held on the first floor because everyone coming into the building will pass by!

Friends studying on the first floor
KHC Closet

In conclusion…

WE LOVE KILACHAND HALL 

and all the fun people, places, and memories made here! <3


Photos © Caroline Perna & Veronica McKinney 2022

That Moment When You Know a College is Right for You: The 9th Floor of Kilachand Hall

Gabrielle Gewirtz (CAS’24)

There’s a moment everyone talks about during the college decision making process; when you know that there’s one college that makes you feel at home and overall just feels right. Making this decision during COVID, when I could not visit any schools, was very difficult. I chose BU because it checked all of my boxes—big school, research university, in a city, close to home, but not too close—but I didn’t know if, when I got to campus, I would have that feeling of rightness.

I moved into Kilachand Hall in late August with an anxious feeling: would I fit in here? Pushing those anxious thoughts aside, I started unpacking my boxes and suitcases. After moving in and meeting my roommates, we decided to start checking out places to get more comfortable with BU campus and our dorm. Since it was already pretty late, and we wanted to stay in our building, we decided to check out the 9th floor of Kilachand Hall to see the views of the city.

We took the elevator up to the 9th floor, and as soon as we got off, I was hit with that feeling. Around us, people were either doing work at tables or playing card games and talking to friends. Everyone looked at ease, and some people were even wearing pajamas. I immediately liked the feel of the 9th floor; you could go there to get work done, or even to be unproductive, and no one would care.

My roommates and I went to one of the big windows to look at the view, and again I was hit with the same feeling. I’ve always loved the nighttime, but Boston at night is especially gorgeous with its bright lights and zooming cars. I could easily picture myself up there on another night, playing games with friends or working on a late night project. At that point, looking out the window into the city, I knew I had chosen the right school.

Since coming to BU, I have gone up to the 9th floor more times than I could count. I’ve been to game nights with friends and have worked on group projects with people also in the honors college. Going to the 9th floor has been a great way to meet up with friends, and even meet new people. It’s also a place that has given many people, including myself, that indescribable feeling of rightness; that you know you chose the right place to be.


Image © Gabrielle Gewirtz 2022

Looking Back as a Senior: Advice to My Freshman Year Self

By: Anna Natrakul (CAS ’22)

These are some things that I’ve learned throughout my time at BU, and I wish it wouldn’t have taken me this long to really embrace these tips!

Enjoy where you are right now

Be present in the moment without always planning for the next thing. Intentionally make time for moments of reflecting on how far you’ve come, whether this is by talking with an old friend, taking a walk, or journaling.

Sleep is NOT for the weak

Seriously, even if you might feel fine at the time, sleeping only a few hours per night is not something that you should be okay with or proud of. Create tangible sleep goals and hold yourself accountable!

Be more open to uncertainty

Don’t underestimate all the amazing people and opportunities that you will meet just by being willing to explore new things.

Say “yes” more…

Say yes to joining that club, meeting new people, and just in general putting yourself out of your comfort zone!

… but also know when to say no

Don’t put pressure on yourself to commit to things that you’re not excited about.

Spend some quality time outside every day

Yes! And don’t trick yourself into thinking that this isn’t “productive” enough for you (after all, being outdoors truly is productive for your physical and mental health).

It’s okay to live by a schedule, as long as your schedule includes time for you to relax

Regularly make time for the things that you enjoy but aren’t required to do. Try sleeping in, reading a book, catching up with family, or enjoying your favorite food.

Remember that you’re still learning

Soon you’ll look back and be amazed at all that you learned and how you grew in such a short period of time. Don’t be so hard on yourself and celebrate every small victory!

Be kind to yourself (seriously), and let your actions show it

Don’t only go out of your way to do nice things for others; also do nice things for yourself! And I mean REALLY treat yourself. Go to that symphony concert or ballet show you’ve been dying to see, go out for dinner after a difficult exam, take a break and have that movie night with friends.

By putting these tips into action, one thing I was able to do was create this painting of the Boston skyline (it’s the view from the 9th floor study lounge of Kilachand Hall) last summer. Making art has always been meaningful to me, but I hadn’t allowed myself the time nor space to truly enjoy it in a very long time. I hope that this advice can similarly encourage you as well!

Anna

Photo/Painting © Anna Natrakul 2022

My Experience with KHC Co-curriculars

By Jan Bhatt (CAS'23)

As an ambassador and peer mentor, the most common question I’ve received is about what KHC co-curriculars are, and what my co-curricular experiences have been like. So I’m going to talk about my favorite co-curriculars today! My freshman year, we were required to attend 3 co-curriculars per semester, which has since been reduced to 2 per semester. My favorite experience was the book reading and lecture with Angie Cruz. She is one of my favorite authors. We read her novel Dominicana in my KHC studio freshman year, and ever since she has become an author that I highly admire and relate to as an immigrant myself. She read excerpts from her novel and talked abundantly about her experiences as an immigrant and as an author, and it was incredible to have the opportunity to ask questions to and directly hear from someone I look up to. She is an inspiration to me and this KHC’s co-curricular event was a dream come true. 

The most memorable, impactful and knowledgeable conversation that I have ever had was also during a KHC co-curricular. The co-curricular was about Dawnland, a documentary celebrating the Native American community and highlighting the atrocities committed against them in the past that we also had the opportunity to watch during Studio freshman year. KHC hosted the makers of the documentary and held a Q&A about the film. It was incredibly illuminating, as the talk allowed me to better comprehend the range of perspectives of people from the Native American community, and internalize the fact that I and every non-Native American person in America is on stolen land. I still have a poster that they gave out by the end of the co-curricular hanging on my wall, I have been bringing it with me from home to my dorm room, back and forth ever since the event. It reads “You are on indigenous land.” It challenged my perception of the world by highlighting how successfully the Native American identity has been erased from this country, and helped me to reflect on and reduce my own ignorance and lack of understanding regarding the issue. 

Overall, every KHC co-curricular has taught me and exposed me to new interdisciplinary perspectives, and I am so grateful for the learning opportunities that they have presented to me.

College Dorm Room Recommendations

By Kadie Cathcart (CAS’23)

There is no understating the uniquely luxurious Kilachand Honors College exclusive experience that is having a personal bathroom within your dorm freshman year. Sharing this information with anyone in Towers, Warren, or West is the easiest way to spark jealousy amongst your peers.

However, aside from the aforementioned bathroom, the dorm rooms within KHC are not highly atypical of any of those found throughout the rest of BU’s campus. Any good dorm room has its personal touches and unique decor, but there are undoubtedly a number of important practical items every college dorm room should have.

As someone who lived in Kilachand freshman year and has lived in on-campus apartments for the last two years, I think I have accumulated a good list of the most important and often overlooked college dorm essentials.

1. Bed Sheet Fasteners - To avoid the issue of waking up in the middle of the night with your fitted sheet off the corner on your bed and on your foot, these fasteners ensure your fitted sheet will stay in place and offer a much more pleasant and less restrictive sleeping experience.

2. Boyfriend Bed Pillow Rest - Perfect for the times when you simply don’t want to sit at a desk to do work or want to relax and watch a show to decompress.

3. Dorm Slippers - Far more comfortable than a pair of outdoor shoes and extremely convenient for running down to get laundry or hang out with friends on your floor!

4. Brita Water Filter - Though Boston tap water has a reputation for being some of the best in the country, there’s nothing quite like having cold, crisp, filtered water at your fingertips.

5. Stick-On Phone Wallet - Though maybe not a “dorm room essential,” this may be the college essential. Especially when living in a dorm you have to swipe in and out of, like Kilachand, having your Terrier card readily accessible is truly an essential thing.

6. Command Hooks - Can be used for more practical purposes like hanging up bags or coats as well as for help hanging fun wall decorations or photos!

7. Extra Utensil Set - Perfect for the times where you want to have a dorm dinner or afternoon snack. Always handy to have when the late-night microwavable mac-and-cheese craving kicks in.

8. Bed Skirt - A bed skirt can mask all evil. Especially when you want to store things under your bed, a bed skirt can help to keep your room looking polished and cleaner than it may actually be.

9. Extra Seating - If you are someone who likes to have friends over in your room, consider getting an extra foldable chair for any visitors who may not fit on your bed or desk chair.

10. Mini Vacuum - It’s always surprising to see how much hair can accumulate in a college dorm room (especially one with carpet). Having a mini vacuum on hand to clean up crumbs or other messes will make your room feel that much cleaner and more put together. (KHC has standing vacuums you can rent, but its always nice to have one immediately accessible should you need it!).

Making your college dorm feel like home is one of the most important tasks any new college student has; this is where you spend time working, studying, snacking, building relationships, and most importantly sleeping. However, the practical side of dorm room living is an unavoidable thing and should be taken into consideration when preparing for your move to Boston. While these items just scratch the surface of the essentials that could be mentioned, I can guarantee having one or more of them will make your freshman year dorm experience a much more enjoyable and functional thing!


Please note that the links above are included to provide visual aids for the items listed and do not represent an endorsement of a particular product or seller. Check out BU Housing’s What to Bring list for more tips!

How Friendships Bloom

By Gabriela Morgan Longo (CAS’22)

College has taught me that friendships bloom in unexpected circumstances and despite our most embarrassing shortcomings or insecurities.

For example, my now close and supportive relationship with my freshman year roommates defies the reservations I had about living with “strangers” and the clumsiness with which our interactions started. Even if the general adage is that you never get a second chance to make a good first impression, my personal experience is solid evidence that you can overcome many initial social blunders with hundreds of subsequent interactions that better reveal your true nature and lead to genuine bonds of friendship.

As soon as I accepted my admission to BU, I became rattled by nerves. I had chosen a school far from home, where I would be forced to meet and live with new people. I’d have to share a room with strangers! This initial apprehension did not allow me to do any Facebook introductions or anything like that before I came to the deadline on filling out my dorm room application. Therefore, I was filling the form in the dark and putting my name in the random draw.

When I got 4 names back my restlessness increased. I was assigned to a suite where I would have to share my room with not one, but TWO strangers! I received 4 names and a room number, but other than that I had no idea how to reach out to them. I checked my email all the time and searched every social media platform I knew but couldn’t find any matches for the names I was given. Finally, sometime in July, I got an email from BU Housing in my personal account inbox telling me I could find information about my housing assignment in my school associated email account. My school associated email!?! I did not know I had one of those! Low and behold, as soon as I signed in to the me @bu.edu account tons of emails answering every question I had about college sat waiting for me, including, of course, an email from my suitemate Jillian with a phone number and an invitation to join a suitemates groupchat. My first message to that groupchat was something along the lines of “Hi guys! Sorry I missed all the introductions but I don’t know anything about college :/”. So that was my first impression!

Bumbling and nervous and probably a little goofy… I worried about this first impression for days. The first impression I made on my roommates was a text message I sent in a suite groupchat which I joined weeks after my other four suitemates had been using it to share their hopes and expectations for a wonderful new year. So, I started our relationship by having to explain to my “future best friends” (hopefully) that I had not been ignoring them during those weeks but that I simply had been clueless about the separate email for all things BU and had, therefore, been completely unaware of ALL the updates and information related to college and dorm and roommate assignments for over a month. For days after sending that text I worried that my suitemates would perceive this opening faux pas as evidence of the fact that I was too goofy to befriend. Somehow, however, the incident that I worried had painted me as clueless and bumbling had been perceived by my kind suitemates as sincere, nice, and maybe the sweet expressions of shyness.

Luckily, that dopey first impression ended up being less impactful than the subsequent hundreds of interactions we shared after move-in. The first night we all slept in the room, my roommate Mira and I went out for a walk, shared our concerns and expectations for our college years and ended up clicking immediately; talking and sharing our thoughts as if we had been friends for years. When I was late to class on my first day, my roommates Mira and Caro helped me collect myself as I rushed to get across campus and earned my devotion due to the tender kindness with which they tolerated my flustered nervousness. As the days and weeks went by, we shared our apprehensions by bringing each other sweets when we got back from class and we walked together into our neighbors’ rooms to introduce ourselves and develop new bonds and friendships. Day by day, one small kindness after another made us an inseparable unit and created shared memories and joys that bonded us together. The transition from strangers to friends was so seamless that I can’t remember or pinpoint when or how it happened. I am certain today, however, that these unexpected interactions with the “strangers” assigned by BU Housing to live with me have made college not only bearable, but fun.

Photo credit: Gabi Morgan Longo

Kilachand First-Year Seminars

By Jan Bhatt (CAS’23) and Michelle Roos (CAS’23)

Hey y’all!!

My name is Jan, and I am an English major on the Pre-Law track! I’m going to talk about my experience with freshman KHC courses as a humanities major, and my friend+roommate Michelle is going to touch upon her experiences as a STEM major. Please please please feel free to reach out to either of us if you have any questions or want to chat!

During my first semester, I signed up for a KHC seminar course called Global Shakespeares: Text, Culture, Appropriation. This was designed like an English course, which as an English major I thoroughly enjoyed. However, for the second semester, my advisor (go Eric!) suggested that I sign up for a course that is different from my major, and I signed up for a chemistry seminar called The Material World. This is the course that I’m going to elaborate on because it was very helpful, not only because it helped with HUB requirements, but also because I was able to learn and retain very important information revolving around climate change and resource depletion. I still remember the few cases that we studied in that class, and I love bringing them up when talking about accountability of large corporations. It was taught by Professor Linda Doerrer, who is a very fun, easy going and interesting professor. I enjoyed speaking with her and learning from her, especially due to her ability to simplify advanced concepts of chemistry. I am very grateful for the two Studio courses as well, because it enabled us to converse about the ongoing global humanitarian issues like immigration, racism, etc. It gave me a platform to participate in regulated, academic conversations about issues that are relevant to the current socio-political climate. I took both studios with Dr. Amanda Fish, who is absolutely wonderful, and is willing to be helpful to the best of her ability. The work-load seemed like a lot to me in the beginning, but that is mostly because I am a massive procrastinator and left the assignments to the last minute.  I eventually got the hang of time management and not leaving most of my work to the last minute and it helped me a lot! So that would be a portion of my piece of advice: time management, and communication. Reach out to your professors if you are confused about the assignment, if you need an extension, or if you need extra help! Nine times out of ten, the professors are more than willing to accommodate and help you out! To summarize, my experience with first year KHC courses, minus some hiccups (mostly caused due to my personal shortcomings), was overall incredibly positive and rewarding!


Hi! I'm Michelle, a neuroscience major and chemistry minor in KHC. In the fall of my freshman year, I took the same Shakespeare seminar as Jan, where we were given the opportunity to read and analyze a wide range of adaptations of Shakespeare's classic works. Last spring, I selected another first-year seminar entitled “Whose Schools: Power, Equality, and Public Education”. In this class, I found it insightful to learn not only of the inequalities in Boston Public Schools, but also how the education system ties into larger, systemic, socio-economic issues. In addition to these seminars, I also completed two semesters of Studio during my first year at KHC. I liked how most of the writing assignments for this class were relatively open-ended, with the opportunity to construct a research paper on any topic given in the second semester. I chose to write about the treatment of individuals with psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders under the U.S. healthcare and criminal justice systems; this paper is only one example of how a KHC class enabled me to consider the information relevant to courses in my major under a new light.

I am grateful to KHC and the academic advising I have received (shoutout to Amanda!) for encouraging me to take interesting classes that I would not have otherwise taken. These classes have allowed me to expand my interests and gain an interdisciplinary perspective of many of the world's most challenging dilemmas. As a STEM major, I often find it more comfortable to stick to hardcore science courses than to grapple with the tough questions that are presented in KHC classes. Nevertheless, there is something especially rewarding about completing a difficult paper or engaging in a class discussion that I do not experience in my STEM classes. By forcing me out of my comfort zone, I believe that the courses that I have taken and will take in the future in KHC will allow me to emerge from college as a more well-rounded individual who is (hopefully) more prepared for graduate school.

Kilachand Hall. Credit Jan B.
Kilachand Hall. Credit Jan B.

Getting Around Campus

By Matt Kim (CAS ‘22)

Above: Walking down Comm Ave during a sunset. The bustling atmosphere of students going about their day in West Campus really brings the city feel to life.


Boston is one of those walking cities. It’s walkable because things are close by, but it’s also walkable because the sights are so beautiful. Coming from a fairly small town myself, I was taken aback by the cityscape every time I walked to class in East Campus or to hockey practice in West. Many of you will start off your first year by walking around everywhere to get a feel of campus, and it’s the best way to do it! You get to explore the atmosphere and experience, firsthand, of life in a city college.

Whether you bike, skate, take the bus, or walk to class, there’s something for everyone. Since you’ll be living in the Kilachand dorm, you’ll be placed squarely in East Campus. If you want to make it to the other side of campus, it’s a short walk to the BU bus stop, or a pleasant 15 minute walk over. There are your Blue Bikes, where you can pay a small fee to borrow a bike if you’re really in a hurry; the bike lanes are wide and safe enough for bikers and the skateboarder/scooterer (is that a real word?). Alternatively, if you bring your own bike, Kilachand has a neat space to store it on the first floor. And of course, there’s the famous T that shoots down the entire length of campus. You can either pay per ride, or get a semester pass for unlimited use during the academic semester (found on the StudentLink). For those not familiar with the T system, it has stops all throughout BU’s campus, so it’s a quick and efficient way of travel. And not to mention, it goes directly into downtown Boston for a fun weekend with your new roommate(s) and friends!

The BU bus is my main method of transportation nowadays, since I have to travel back and forth from class to practice to research to home. The bus runs every day and during most hours of the day, so you can get around whenever you need to. You can download the BU bus app on your phone, and once you find the bus stops, it’s a piece of cake to catch a quick ride to wherever you’re going to. But walking has its perks too. You get to be surrounded by other students while walking down Baystate Road and admiring the beautiful scenery, or strolling past the BU Beach and the Esplanade, the GSU (George Sherman Union) building, and even Agganis Arena. Walking is both therapeutic and good for your health, especially after a year of staying inside. So whether you have your own wheels or just your feet, go out there and explore campus!

(Some of) The Amazing Places to Study on Campus

By Anna Natrakul (CAS’22)

Although BU students have varying preferences when it comes to study spots, these are just a few of my favorites! I hope that this list will be helpful in finding your own favorite places to sit down and have a productive study session, whether when studying with friends or by yourself! They have been numbered in no particular order (although perhaps it is no coincidence that the 9th floor of Kilachand ended up as #1).

1. 9th floor of Kilachand Hall

Anna N 1 - 9th floor  Anna N 2 - 9th floor view

Ever since living in Kilachand Hall for my first two years at BU, this has been one of my favorite places to study (at any hour, because it is open 24/7)! The 9th floor is divided into two major sections: a quiet study lounge (perfect for getting in the right headspace for exams) and a spacious common area with additional couches (great for hanging out with friends in study groups). It has stunning panoramic views that include the Boston skyline and the Charles River! The photo on the right is the view from the 9th floor of a gorgeous sunset sky, snapped during my first semester.

2. BU School of Law Café

Anna N 3 BU Law 1  Anna N 3 BU law cafe 2  Anna N 5 BU law cafe 3

The BU School of Law Complex is beautiful in its entirety (photo on left), with tons of study nooks on its multiple floors. I especially love the spacious and bright School of Law Café on the second floor (middle and right photos), which feels like a breath of fresh air. The floor-to-ceiling windows let in tons of natural light!

3. Kilachand Common Room

Anna N 6 KHC  Anna N 7 KHC 2  Anna N 8 KHC 3

When walking into Kilachand Hall, you are greeted by the beautiful Common Room, a warm and inviting space with a piano and tons of comfortable seating. It feels like a huge living room, and this is where students often mingle, study, or attend Kilachand’s co-curricular events. I took the middle photo while taking a study break to watch a Super Smash Bros. match happening in the background, which just goes to show how versatile and well-loved this room is!

4. Yawkey Center for Student Services

Anna N 9 Yaw  Anna N 10 Yaw

This building offers amazingly bright views and is part of a building complex that includes the Educational Resource Center and Marciano Commons Dining Hall (both of which are great things to have nearby when studying)!

5. Mugar Memorial Library

Anna N Mugar 1  Anna N Mugar 2

This is one of the largest libraries on campus, so not only does it include lots of resources for doing research, writing papers, and finding books, but every floor has a different noise level, which means that you can choose to work anywhere from the bustling first floor to the silent upper floors! Work areas range from individual cubicles to common tables and lounge chairs. Most BU students would attest to Mugar being a place of intense productivity that has seen us through countless projects, papers, and exams.

Again, this list only scratches the surface of all the great BU study spots. Given this starting point, some additional places to explore include the new Howard Thurman Center, the tiny Pickering Educational Resources Library tucked in the basement of Wheelock College, and the College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) Think Tank!

All photos credit Anna N.

Common Room Conversation

Hello, hello!

I am Susritha Kopparapu, a junior double majoring in Biology and Computer Science in the College of Arts and Sciences.

And I am Emily Oros, a junior studying Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering with a minor in biology.

We are both from Massachusetts and were roommates our freshman and sophomore years. Although we are no longer living together, we have become great friends and it’s all thanks to our time living in Kilachand Hall.

Watch our video to hear us talk about some of our experiences our freshman year!

You might have heard us talking about FIRs, who are Faculty-in-Residence. These are professors who serve as mentors and role models for the students in their living and learning dorm. They are always up for conversation, whether that be about academics, careers, or hobbies. In our experience, FIRs are a critical resource especially during the transition from high school to college, and the relationships that develop have lasting impacts beyond your freshman year.

Thanks for listening to us reminisce about the good old days :,)

-- Emily and Susritha