Test Kitchen: Spicy Lentils, Sweet Potatoes, and Kale

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College
Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

The three main ingredients in this recipe are a dietitian’s dream: lentils, a great source of plant protein, sweet potatoes, powerhouse food of vitamin A and C, and kale, the trendiest food of 2013.  All three are “superfoods” in their own right, but when you combine them in this savory dish they become a super meal.

pre kale

Although Karen referred to this as a soup (which it could easily be converted to with the addition of a bit more chicken broth), it actually has the consistency of a warm salad or stew.  It would make a wonderful main dish for four, or a side dish for 6-8 people.  We made a few modifications to the recipe, such as leaving out the Serrano pepper, and it was very well received.  People were getting up for seconds and thirds!

One important thing to know about this recipe is that it is vital that all of the vegetables be diced about the same size.  This ensures even cooking of each ingredient, which leads to a better final result.  We also found that the lentils were a little undercooked after the recommended half hour, but we were hungry so we ate it anyway.  To prevent this, you should soak the lentils in water or chicken broth for about an hour before cooking the recipe.

This recipe was a super tasty way to get many vitamins and minerals in one pot, and I highly recommend you try it as soon as you can!

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Sargent Choice
Spicy Lentils with Sweet Potatoes and Kale
Recipe adapted from Eat Live Run Blog
Yield: 4 servings

 Ingredients
2 teaspoons canola oil
¼ cup small diced onion
1 stalk celery, small diced
1 large carrot, peeled and diced small
1 whole sweet potato, peeled and chopped into small ½ -inch cubes
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 bunch lacinato kale, leaves torn into bits
½ cup green lentils
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
1 serrano pepper, whole (do not dice)*
¼ teaspoon salt
2 cups vegetable stock

 Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a medium-sized pot.  Once hot, add the onion, celery, carrot and sweet potato and cook for about six minutes, until starting to soften. Add the garlic and kale and continue cooking until the kale starts to wilt.
  2. Add the lentils, bay leaf, rosemary sprigs, serrano pepper and stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for about 30 minutes until lentils are tender and have absorbed most of the liquid. *NOTE: When doubling recipe, it is not necessary (or recommended) to double the number of serrano peppers.
  3. Season with salt. Remove the bay leaf, serrano pepper and rosemary springs before serving.

Serving suggestion: Serve with  whole wheat crusty bread. ENJOY!

 Nutrition Facts per serving

Calories 370
Fat 14 g
Saturated Fat 3.5 g
Protein 14 g
Carbohydrate 48 g
Fiber 8 g
Sodium 380 mg

Test Kitchen: Blueberry Cobbler

By Stephanie Smith, Nutrition student with Journalism focus

After a brutally cold winter, one that was plagued by the term “polar vortex” and seeing snow almost every week, I think it’s safe to say that we’re all ready for spring and finally we’re beginning to see the signs—temperatures are rising, April showers are definitely in full swing, and flowers are blooming.

Aside from the warmer weather, I love springtime for all of the fresh fruits and vegetables that are popping up as farmer’s markets reopen and gardens begin to flourish. I’m always looking for something fun to make with my fruits and veggies and at this week’s test kitchen, I think I may have found the most delicious dessert, made with one of my favorite fruits—blueberries.

This week we made a blueberry cobbler. Blueberries aren’t usually seen as much of a springtime fruit, as they are a summer fruit, but this week, blueberries were all we could talk about. The recipe called for frozen blueberries—the beauty of frozen produce is that you can get anything you like all year round!

Our recipe was adapted from Ellie Krieger. Krieger is a registered dietitian, herself, so there wasn’t much tweaking to be made to this recipe. Whole wheat flour substitutes any kind of all-purpose flour and there is very little sugar added to the already sweet berries.

This recipe is great, because you can use any type of berry that you have on hand. We only used blueberries and everyone loved it, but replacing or adding strawberries, raspberries, or blackberries, would taste delicious! I think I can speak for everyone at the test kitchen, in saying that it is one of the best desserts that we’ve made so far. It’s super easy to make, and going back for seconds isn’t an option, but instead, mandatory!

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Sargent Choice Berry Cobbler
Yields 6 servings

 Ingredients:
For the filling:
Cooking spray
2 (12-ounce bags) bags frozen berries (mixed or blueberries)
¼ cup white whole wheat flour
¼ cup sugar
2 teaspoons finely grated orange zest

 For the topping:
½ cup white whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar, divided
½ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/3 cup low-fat buttermilk
2 tablespoons canola oil

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 400˚F.
2. Coat and 8×8-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
3. In a large bowl, toss the filling ingredients: berries, flour, sugar, zest. Transfer the berry mixture to the baking dish and set aside.
4. In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, 2 tablespoons of sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Cut in the butter using 2 knives or a pastry cutter until many small pebble-sized pieces are formed.
5. In a small bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and oil. Add the buttermilk-oil mixture to the dry ingredients and mix until just moistened. Do not over mix.
6. Drop the batter onto the fruit forming 6 mounds. Sprinkle with the remaining teaspoon of sugar.
7. Bake for 30 minutes, until fruit is bubbly and top is golden. Let stand for at least 10 minutes before serving.

 

Nutrition Facts:
1 serving ~3/4 cup

Calories 220
Fat 9 g
Saturated Fat 3 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 34 g
Fiber 5 g

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website.

Sargent Choice Nutrition Center’s Jenn Culbert featured on “Better For You” blog

By: Anna Lee, Sargent Choice Student Ambassador

Eating healthy can seem harder now more than ever with a constant stream of nutrition tips continuously flooding the media. New foods are constantly trending as the “new healthy alternative” with guaranteed health benefits or reduced caloric intake. With so much information, it can be hard to decipher a fad from a breakthrough. So, which foods are actually worth the investment?

Jenn Culbert, one of Boston University Sargent Choice Nutrition Center’s dietitians, was recently featured on a blog called “Better for You”, discussing the issue of trending food items. In the article she states, “The problem with a lot of foods that start to become popular and tightly touted: Research may not match the claims.”

Culbert along with Kerri-Ann Jennings, a registered dietitian from Vermont, address several popular food items in the blog, including whole grains, kefir, coconut oil and chia seeds. To read the final verdict on these and other item, visit http://betterforyou.com/article/nutrition/sos-wallet-friendly-wellness-foods to read the rest of the article!

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website.

Test Kitchen: French Night

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College
Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and learn about different cultures through food.

Bonjour readers! That is just about the extent of my knowledge of the French language, but thankfully I know much more about French food.  French food is usually very closely associated with richness and with butter, so making the classic crepe healthy was an interesting challenge.  Luckily, our dietitians at the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center are masters of making healthy versions of not so healthy treats.

Our versions of crepes were adapted from Eating Well magazine, and used canola oil instead of butter and whole wheat flour instead of regular processed flour.  To make the crepes we used a hot griddle, but a hot frying pan on the stove would work just as well.  And if you don’t have a crepe spreader, the back of a spoon works great! The consensus from the group was that the crepes were delicious, although a bit dry.  To solve this issue, we added more toppings!

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We served both a sweet and a savory crepe.  The savory crepe had a phenomenal spinach and mushroom filling, that was wicked easy to whip up and complemented the crepe very nicely.  For the dessert crepes, we didn’t go the traditional Nutella route (I know, its delicious but not very Sargent Choice).  We served a sweet ricotta cream (think cannoli filling) and also peanut butter and bananas.  Another good option would be to serve the crepes with low-fat yogurt and berries. I might have to go make another batch, just describing them is making me hungry! Au revoir readers!

Sargent Choice
Whole Wheat Crepes
Recipe from Eating Well

Ingredients
1 cup white whole wheat flourScreenshot 2014-03-28 23.01.35
1 teaspoon sugar (for dessert crepes only; optional
¼ teaspoon salt
3 large eggs
½ cup 1% milk
2 teaspoons canola oil
½ cup seltzer or club soda

Combine whole-wheat flour, sugar (if using), salt, eggs, milk and oil in a food processor; process until smooth, scraping the sides once or twice. Transfer to a bowl, cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.Directions

  1. Slowly whisk seltzer water (or club soda) into the crepe batter.  Lightly oil a small nonstick skillet with a crumpled paper towel; heat the skillet over medium-high heat.  Ladle about 2 tablespoons batter into the skillet with a small ladle or measuring cup; immediately tilt and rotate the pan to spread the batter evenly over the bottom.
  2. Cook the crepe until the underside is lightly browned, about 30 seconds.  Using a small metal spatula or fork, lift the edge of the crepe, quickly grasp it with your fingers and flip.  Cook until the second side is lightly browned, about 20 seconds longer.  Slide the crepe onto a plate.
  3. If serving immediately, fill and roll or fold the crepe.  Continue to cook crepes with the remaining batter, oiling the pan as needed and stacking crepes as you go.

 

Mushroom and Spinach Filling IngredientsScreenshot 2014-03-28 23.01.50
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
12 ounces sliced mixed mushrooms (about 3 ¾ cups)
2/3 cup thinly sliced shallots
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary, plus more for garnish
¼ teaspoon salt
5 ounces baby spinach
6 tablespoons crumbled goat cheese

Directions
Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat.  Add mushrooms, shallots, rosemary and salt and cook, stirring, until the mushrooms are soft and have released their liquid, about 6 minutes.  Stir in spinach a handful and at a time and cook until silted, about 4 minutes.  Cover to keep warm.

 

Suggestions for sweet fillings: Screenshot 2014-03-28 23.02.23
Peanut butter
Berries (strawberries, blueberries, etc.)
Sliced bananas
Trader Joe’s Midnight Moo (1 teaspoon on top of fruit/and or peanut butter)
Sweetened Ricotta Cheese

To make Sweetened Ricotta Cream:
1 cup part-skim ricotta cheese
4 teaspoons fat-free milk
2 teaspoons powdered sugar (or granulated sugar or honey)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

In a small bowl, mix together until thoroughly combined.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Test Kitchen: Hamantaschen Cookie

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

Greetings blog readers! I’m not Jewish but this week at the Test Kitchen we learned about a Hebrew holiday that is coming up called Purim.  Essentially it’s a silly holiday equivalent to Halloween and one of the delicious traditions is Hamantaschen cookies!  They are shaped like a three-cornered-hat after one that a character from the story, Haman, wore.

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For this recipe, we decided to make two versions of the cookie: one traditional full-blown cookie, and one Sargent Choice-d cookie.  This is for a few reasons.  First of all, Karen has a fantastic recipe for these treats that she makes with her family, and she wanted to share it with all of us.  We also didn’t know how the SC version would do, as baked goods are a little tricky to get to conform to our principles.  In the end, both versions were delicious and we ended up with a ton of yummy cookies.

Some modifications and tips and tricks for when you try out this recipe: add a little orange zest to the dough.  It gives lightness to traditional sugar cookie dough, and makes them really special.  Also when pinching the corners of the “hat” together, make sure you do it pretty tight to make sure the filling doesn’t spill out when cooking.  The dough should also be pretty dry to reduce spreading when cooking.  The recipe called for a strawberry filling, but we also experimented with blueberry and poppy seed filling (the poppy seed was divine, it tastes like honey!).

So readers, enjoy these cookies on Purim or whenever you need a sweet treat.  I know I will be!

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

“Fit For Success”

By Margo Wilson, Journalism Student, Sargent Choice Student Ambassador

Recently Rachel Reynolds, one of our Dietitians at Sargent Choice Nutrition Center, was featured in a BUTV news piece that aired on BUTV 10 and Good Morning BU. Rachel was interviewed by Melissa Adan, who put together the video story. The clip, titled “Fit For Success” was a short piece on how many people make fitness goals in the new year but have trouble keeping them. Reynolds gave some advice on how to keep up with health goals and what kinds of foods to eat to feel more full and provide maximum nutrition for your body

You can watch the video below for further advice on making your fitness goals last throughout the year.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Creating a New Vegan Sargent Choice Offering – BBQ ‘Meatball’ Sub

Corcoran Downey, BU Dietetic Intern

scveg

As the Sargent Choice Dietetic Intern in my food service rotation I was challenged with the task of creating a new Sargent Choice menu item that could be incorporated into the regular cycle menus of the dining halls on Boston University’s Campus. At first I wasn’t quite sure even where to begin. After looking through the cycle menu at Marciano Commons Dining Hall I realized that the offerings at the Vegan station were more limited than other stations. The menu including a large array of Asian inspired dishes, including stir-fry’s, quite a few salads, and a few Mexican inspired dishes. I became inspired to challenge myself, a non-vegan, to create a vegan entre that would bring a little variety to the cycle menu. I enjoy cooking and enjoy trying out new foods so I was up for the challenge!

I begin by thinking about something that I would like to cook for myself; lately I have been enjoying cooking with lentils and the flavors of basic curries. My initial idea was to use eggplant, which isn’t frequently served, and stuff a small Japanese Eggplant with the curried lentil and vegetable mixture. The size of the Japanese eggplants would be perfect for serving while making for a great presentation! However, I was quickly made aware of the current price for a case of Japanese Eggplants and it was way over my budget! Back to the drawing board I went. I began to shift my thinking towards finding a menu item that would not only bring diversity to the Vegan station, but also appeal to all students, vegan, vegetarian, and those without dietary preferences or restrictions. I couldn’t get the idea of BBQ out of my mind; I mean come on, who doesn’t love some good BBQ? So from here I set out to find a way to bring a BBQ menu item to the vegan station. I still wanted to use lentils in my dish given that the vegan cycle menu offerings use primarily tofu and seitan as the main protein source. A lentil oat burger is already offered on the cycle menu, so I didn’t want to just make a lentil based burger, I wanted to go further outside of the box. I took my next idea and ran with it, I would create a BBQ lentil based ‘meatball’ and serve it on a sub roll with coleslaw and a roasted vegetable based side salad!

Coming up with a recipe for my idea proved a little more challenging than I expected; many hour were spent on the internet searching through recipes of vegan ‘meatballs’, ‘meatloaves’, and burgers. I finally settled on two recipes, one that used only lentils and one that used lentils and tofu. The first recipe called for chia seeds as the binder; however chia seeds aren’t a realistic egg replacer for a large-scale dining hall production. Nonetheless, I wanted to mention this because chia seeds could work fantastically as an egg replacer for those of you cooking vegan meals at home!  I spent a good deal of time looking up vegan egg replacers and found a few sources that suggested silken or other tofu. This information pushed me towards the second recipe! With a few slight tweaks I was able to ‘finalize’ the recipe for a test meal!

The preparation on the day of my test meal, as well as the production, went very smoothly. The ‘meatballs’ came together well, as did the coleslaw and the side salad. As I was simmering the ‘meatballs’ in the BBQ sauce over medium heat I began to realize that one or two of my ‘meatballs’ had crumbled as I was stirring; from then on I was very careful to ensure that I didn’t lose anymore! This however did get me thinking that the recipe needed a little tweaking, I had to find a way to get the ‘meatballs’ to hold together better, especially for a large scale lunch service where a server cannot be super careful while stirring a large pot of ‘meatballs’! I was able to successfully make four BBQ ‘meatball’ sandwiches to be tested by myself, Executive Chef Adam Pagan, Jennifer Culbert, RD and Lisa Ferreira, RD. I was a little nervous going into the tasting, would my idea turn out well, would they enjoy the meal, or had something gone terribly wrong? I was so relieved when everyone loved the sandwiches! As a group we did bring up the need for a little more binding and a little more moisture to help the ‘meatballs’ hold up better. Adam and I were able to come up with an easy solution of pureeing half of the cooked lentils with a little bit of vegetable stock in a blender, this would act as more of a binding agent while bringing some moisture to the ‘meatballs’! For those of you making these at home, if you are okay with a more crumbly ‘meatball’, or are only making a few so being careful while mixing in the BBQ sauce isn’t an issue, than this step could easily be left out; however to the sake of a large scale service and providing BU students with the highest quality product we decided to alter the recipe to include pureeing ½ of the cooked lentils, which worked fantastically!

The BBQ lentil ‘meatballs’ were served on a small whole wheat sub roll and topped with Carolina-style vinegar based coleslaw to add crunch and contrasting flavors. A side salad of roasted vegetables and black beans tossed in cilantro lime vinaigrette rounded out the meal!

 

BBQ ‘Meatball’ Sub
Serves: 8
Ingredients:

  • ½ cup yellow onion, finely diced
  •  ½ cup red bell pepper, finely diced
  • 2 ¼ tsp brown sugar
  • 1 cup brown lentils, dry
  • 2 Tbsp low sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 package tofu, extra firm, drained
  • 2 ¼ tsp low sodium soy sauce
  • 1 cup whole grain cornmeal
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • ¾ tsp chili powder
  • ¾ tsp cumin
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup BBQ sauce
  • 8 100% whole wheat sub rolls

Directions:

  1. Cook the lentils by bringing 2 cups of water and lentils to a boil in a pot over high heat, reduce heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 20-25 minutes. Drain any remaining water.
  2. Divide the lentils in half; set half aside and puree the other half with the vegetable broth then set aside.
  3. While lentils cook, chop your pepper and onion into a small dice.
  4. Add olive oil to a pan over medium-high heat and cook the chopped onions and peppers for several minutes until the vegetables begin to soften. Then add the brown sugar to caramelize the mixture.
  5. Place the tofu in a large bowl, and use a potato masher to squish the tofu into a fine consistency – you could also use a hand mixer here or your hands alone!
  6. Add the soy sauce to the tofu and stir to coat.
  7. Add the whole and pureed lentils to the tofu; continue to mash the mixture, breaking up some of the whole lentils.
  8. Add the cooked onion and pepper mixture, whole grain cornmeal, turmeric, chili powder, and cumin to the lentil and tofu mixture, combine well.
  9. Form the mixture into round balls; your ‘meatballs’ should be about an inch in diameter
  10. Form 32 ‘meatballs’, 4 per serving and place on a sheet pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray.
  11. Place the ‘meatballs’ in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. This can be done a head and place in the refrigerator over night as well.
  12. Preheat oven to 425*F and bake the ‘meatballs’ for 20-25 minutes until the outsides are browned.
  13. Remove the ‘meatballs’ from the oven and place in a large pot, over with BBQ sauce and simmer over medium-low heat.
  14. Place 4 ‘meatballs’ on each whole-wheat sub roll with coleslaw. To complete the meal serve this sandwich alongside a side salad.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Resource Review: NY Times(dot)com

by Ellie Schulman, Film and Television student, College of Communication

Whenever Laura Judd, MS, RD, CSSD makes a recommendation about a resource for recipes we listen! Laura used to work full time at the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center and was the creator of the ever so popular Healthy Cooking on a Budget course.Laura recommended we take a look at NY Times as a recipe resource for us to include here on this blog.

After doing a lot of exploring on the site, I recommend using this NY Times link for recipes only, because there are a lot of other links to nutritional information that are interesting, but it can be very overwhelming to take it all in at once. The recipes section is pretty straightforward—just scroll down a bit and look at the left side of the screen to get the full list of recipe options. You can also click the drop down options to find something you’re interested in.

They organize their recipes by what type of ingredient you want to center the recipe around (e.g. kale, quinoa, oils, etc.). I really love their selection because they feature recipes for more common ingredients like mushrooms and pasta to more imaginative ingredients like polenta and okra. Each section gives a brief introduction and a list of recipes featuring the selected ingredient.

I looked over three of the most interesting recipes to look over to give you guys a good idea of what they have to offer.

Here’s something pretty and creative to blow your mind:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/health/nutrition/beet-rice-and-goat-cheese-burgers.html?ref=beets

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/health/nutrition/beet-rice-and-goat-cheese-burgers.html?ref=beets

Can you tell what it is? It’s a Beet, Rice, and Goat Cheese Burger that I found under the “Beets” category.

I’ll let you look over the whole recipe on your own by clicking the image, but I will say that, other than for its pretty color, I like this recipe because you can make them up to 3 days before you want to eat it. Which is perfect for college students because you can make a batch on a Sunday and eat them over the next couple of days when you don’t have time in the evening to make a full meal.

Here’s the next one that got my attention:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/health/nutrition/29recipehealth.html?ref=buckwheat

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/health/nutrition/29recipehealth.html?ref=buckwheat

I Found this one in the “Buckwheat” category. Hot and Sour Soba Salad! Say that 5 times fast.

I like this recipe because as the writer, Martha Shulman (not related to me) says, “I find any combination of noodles and hot-and-sour dressing fairly addictive.” Much like the Beet Burgers, you can cook the noodles up to 3 days ahead as well, so all you have to do the day of is add the dressing. Click the image to find the recipe.

The last recipe I want to feature is this here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/health/nutrition/skillet-collards-and-winter-squash-with-barley-recipes-for-health.html?ref=wintersquash

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/health/nutrition/skillet-collards-and-winter-squash-with-barley-recipes-for-health.html?ref=wintersquash

Skillet Collards and Winter Squash with Barely. I chose this one because it’s winter, so why not feature a winter squash?

I give props to this recipe because it uses collard greens which are way underrated in mainstream recipes. Collards are a good way to load up on minerals and nutrients which your body will thank you for.

Keep in mind that all of the recipes on this site may not be Sargent Choice, but with a few simple ingredient swaps most of them could be. Click here to see what makes a recipe Sargent Choice.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

 

Smart Shopping Tips

Gina Petracca is a first year graduate student at Boston University in Sargent College’s DPD/MS+DI program.

Smart ShoppingLet’s face it: grocery stores are overwhelming. There is an exorbitant amount of food and an endless number of options. Where do you even begin? And how are you supposed to make healthy decisions with so many treats taunting you at every turn? To start, here are some basic tips to help keep your shopping experience quick and healthy.

Navigate the perimeter. The majority of the food that you actually need is located on the perimeter of the store. Sure, you need to go down a few aisles to get things like canned goods, pasta, rice, bread, cereal, and coffee; but there is no need to snake through the aisles. The “snaking” method exposes you to tons of products that you do not actually need, but that look appealing/necessary. Foods that are in their “whole” or original state (ex: produce, meat) are on the perimeter and just so happen to require refrigeration. Foods that are processed are in the aisles. Stick to the perimeter instead.

#1 Make a list#1 Make a list and stick to it: we’ve all heard it before—make a shopping list if you want to save money, blah blah blah. But seriously, it works; and even more so when you actually stick to the list. When you go shopping unprepared (especially in a large grocery store like Stop & Shop, Whole Foods, or even the Trader Joes in Coolidge Corner) you may feel overwhelmed by all the options and start throwing anything that looks slightly useful/appetizing into your basket. However, if you go into a grocery store with some sort of plan (no matter what the size of the grocery store), you are equipping yourself with purpose and direction. There is less risk of feeling overwhelmed when you are focused on checking off each item from your list.

#2 30 Minutes
#2 Get in and out in 30 minutes: after you have been in a grocery store for 30 minutes, for every additional minute you spend there, you will spend roughly one additional dollar. What does that mean? For example: if you are in the grocery store for 37 minutes, you will spend $7 more than you meant to spend. Think about it—the longer you’re in the store, you start to become hungry, and those end-of-aisle displays start looking really good. Do not linger in the grocery store. Get in, get out, and get on with your life.

#3 Everything is Real Estate#3 Everything is real estate: items on the end-of-aisle displays are not there because they are the best deal, the healthiest choice, or the tastiest selection. Those items are placed at the end of the aisle because some company paid to have that item placed there. Do not be fooled into thinking that the grocery store has your best interests in mind when they put up displays or stock their shelves. There is a meticulous method to the location of every single item on a shelf or in an aisle: companies pay for product placement. Let’s take the cereal aisle as an example: all the colorful cereal boxes (with cartoons and drawings) are located at kids’ eye level, whereas cereal boxes claiming weight loss miracles are located at adults’ eye level. Coincidence? Of course not! Companies pay to have their products placed where their target audience will see the product and therefore be more inclined to buy the product. Think about why you’re buying a product—is it because you actually need it, or because it was conveniently placed in front of you and now you think that you need it.

#4 Never Shop Hungry#4 Never shop hungry: you know how it works—you go into the store starving and all of a sudden you must have that bag of chips, box of cookies, pint of ice cream, and every other snack food. Prevent these impulse purchases instigated by your grumbling tummy. Make sure you eat something—anything—before you go grocery shopping. And if you absolutely don’t have time to eat a snack before you enter the store? Then go into the grocery store, grab a banana, apple, bag of carrots, or granola bar, buy it, then eat it as you shop. Your stomach will stop making noises and you will be able to focus on the foods you actually need to buy—not the foods your stomach momentarily craves.

Shopping smartly takes practice. Start with small changes—like making a list for the first time or making a bag of trail mix to eat before you go into the store. Eventually you’ll be able to walk into a store and fill your basket with delicious, nutritious, and intentional choices. It is important to make healthy choices about the food you eat, but those healthy decisions don’t start in the kitchen—they start when you are in a grocery store shopping for food.

(Original images courtesy of creative commons, recreated and edited by Megan Smith)

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Dim Sum

By Stephanie Smith, Nutrition student with Journalism focus

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

This week’s test kitchen was dedicated to Asian cuisine and culture: Dim Sum was on the menu. To be honest, I wasn’t all to familiar with what Dim Sum really was, before the test kitchen. I had gone to a restaurant in Chinatown for Dim Sum one time and really enjoyed it. The waiters and waitresses pushed carts around the crowded restaurant and as they passed by you would pick which dishes you wanted. It was an interesting experience, but I didn’t understand what Dim Sum really meant.

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When I was told we’d be making Dim Sum, I was pretty confused.

 

To me Dim Sum was more of an experience than a meal–one where people wheeled carts around for you to choose the food you wanted. Were we going to be making several different Chinese dishes all in one night?

I quickly realized that Dim Sum is actually a style of Cantonese food prepared as small plates or finger food-type dishes. That sure cleared things up. So we were gonna be making a small dish at the test kitchen. We’d be making pot stickers.

Pot stickers, or dumplings as they are often referred to as, originated in China and have since been adopted by many Asian cuisines, each made with different ingredients and different preparation methods. Pot stickers are usually stuffed with a meat filling, or often times with vegetables. At the test kitchen, we decided to go for vegetarian pot stickers, to be sure that everybody was able to enjoy the dish.

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There are also different preparation methods used to make pot stickers: boiling, steaming, or frying. We steamed the pot stickers using traditional steamer baskets over a pot of boiling water.

Karen and many of the test kitchen veterans had made this recipe before, so they knew it was going to taste great. But they also had quite a few recommendations on ways to make changes and fix things.

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We changed a lot to this recipe, making it even simpler to make and easier to find and buy ingredients. Our first initial change was to make them without the rice. Karen and students agreed that the rice was just not necessary. As far as the other ingredients, we added only the vegetables and sesame oil. We combined the spinach, mushrooms, water chestnuts, ginger, garlic, and oil. We left out the cornstarch and eggs, though we were a bit weary about how everything would stay together without them, but we gave it a shot. And they turned out great!

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Karen also had some leftover frozen butternut squash from last week’s test kitchen, so we used that too and added some butternut squash to a few of the pot stickers. Those were a hit, too!

All in all, everyone loved the pot stickers and they were so simple to make since we reduced the number of ingredients. They were light and had a great balance of texture between the water chestnuts and the spinach and mushroom.

Pot stickers are traditionally dipped in soy sauce, which is what we did. But we did find that if you don’t dip into soy sauce, they lacked flavor and could have used a pinch of salt. It’s important to remember that soy sauce is high in sodium, so you wouldn’t need to add any additional salt if you were planning on dipping in soy sauce.

 

Sargent Choice Spinach Pot Stickers
Yield: 30 pot stickers
Ingredients
1 cup boiling water
1 (8 ounce) package dried shitake mushrooms
½ cup cooked brown, long-grain rice
1/3 cup finely chopped canned water chestnuts
1 tablespoon minced peeled gingerroot
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 (10 ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed, drained, and squeezed dry
1 garlic clove
Optional: ½ cup cooked brown, long-grain rice; 1 tablespoon cornstarch; 1 egg white

30 wonton wrappers
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 cup water, divided

Directions
1. Combine boiling water and mushrooms in a bowl; cover and let stand 30 minutes. Drain; discard stems, and mince caps.
2. Combine mushroom caps, water chestnuts, cornstarch, gingerroot, sesame oil, spinach, egg white, and garlic. Stir well.
3. Spoon 1 tablespoon of filling mixture into center of each wrapper.
4. Moisten edges of wrapper with water, and bring 2 opposite corners to center and seal. Bring other two corners to center and seal. Pinch 4 edges together firmly to seal. Place pot stickers on a large baking sheet sprinkled with cornstarch. Cover loosely with a towel to keep them from drying out.

Nutrition Facts:
Per pot sticker

Calories: 60; Fat: 1 g; Saturated Fat: 0 g; Protein: 2 g; Carbohydrate: 11 g; Fiber: 1 g

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website